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SaaS Onboarding Email Blog

What are you in the mood for? I’ve got onboarding email breakdowns, strategy how-tos, and SaaS email marketing best practices. Or, just browse the latest down below.

Mint Onboarding Email Breakdown

Mint aims to financially empower users and uses emotion to its advantage during the first 30 days.

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Series Overview

Technically, Mint is free, so there’s no free-trial period. As soon as I signed up I was in. Even so, I planned on capturing emails for the first 30-days, which would be a normal trial period for a financial SaaS. Interestingly, Mint seemed to be on the same page, and I even got what seems like a classic winback email on day 31. Overall, Mint sent six emails over 31 days.

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Day 1: Welcome + Introduce the Building Block

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Subject Line: Welcome aboard!

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Immediately after signup

Objective/Content: Add your most used bank account to get started

CTA: Get Started

Strengths:

First up, subject line. I like that Mint follows standard rules, but not too closely. It’s still clearly a welcome email, but there’s a fun twist. It feels like an adventure is beginning. Or maybe a vacation?

Next, the headline acknowledges the reader’s hopes while reassuring them. Plus, who wouldn’t like to “improve your financial life, and life in general.” The body copy also positions Mint as a resource.

The action that Mint is focused on in this email (and in future ones) is adding a bank account. Since this is the first step Mint needs a user to take to start reaping the benefits of Mint, this is their “building block.”

Finally, Mint’s CTA button has a lock symbol on it. Their service is no more or no less secure thanks to the addition of a lock emoji, but it’s reassuring. They recognize financial information is sensitive, and this is a great (almost subconscious cue) that Mint can be trusted.

What to learn from it:

  • There are ways to be straightforward yet unique. Find them.

  • Do everything you can to let users know you’re on their side. Acknowledge their hopes and fears, reassure their limitations and concerns, and offer all of the knowledge you have

  • Add trust symbols when you’re dealing with sensitive information

Day 2: Feature Spotlight

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Subject Line: Get your free credit score right now in Mint

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Day 2, 9:12 AM CST

Objective/Content: Check your credit score and learn why it matters

CTA: Get My Free Credit Score

Strengths:

Here’s a prime example of a subject line that is truthful about what’s inside, bells and whistles not required. The same action is also listed on not now, but TWO CTA buttons. There’s no walking away from this email wondering what they want you to do.

Plus, notice the language of the CTA button. It isn't “get your free credit score,” it’s “get my free credit score.” It’s personal.

Mint is all about making users feel empowered and positive about their finances, so notice that their animation doesn’t show a score for the lowest end in red. If a user is reminded how low their score could be, they sure don't want to click and find out.

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The list in the middle of the email also lays out exactly what to expect when they click through. And it’s basically everything you could need.

What to learn from it:

  • Be conscious of never making users feel bad about themselves. No matter what their state of work/life/organization/finances is today; you need to be their happy place featuring the best version they can achieve

  • Test using “my” instead of “your” in copy and CTAs. Then the action is being taken from their perspective, and not because they were told to do it

Day 5: Use Case

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Subject Line: Join the millions taking control of their money

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Day 5, 7:00 AM CST

Objective/Content: Check your credit score and learn why it matters

CTA: Get My Free Credit Score

Strengths:

Holy social proof! Mint has put their millions of customers to work in the subject line and animation on Day 5. Mint is also touting their service as a “movement.” This might be a bold claim, but by golly it’s enticing.

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There’s also a big overarching use case — Mint as the means to achieve financial freedom. Again, that’s a big claim. But don’t tell me you don’t want that.

What to learn from it:

  • Use social proof to make users feel a part of something bigger than themselves. You may not have millions of customers like Mint does, but there are still ways to make new customers feel the community.

Day 16: Use Case

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Subject Line: Budgeting doesn’t have to hurt

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Day 16, 9:40 AM CST

Objective/Content: Use Mint tools to make budgeting easier

CTA: Get Started

Strengths:

The subject line on Mint’s Day 16 email demonstrates an understanding of their customer, and how they feel about money matters. The line is addressing a concern users have and pointing out that there’s a way to make a previously unpleasant task easier. Sympathy for the user’s situation also shows up in the copy with the line “See where your hard-earned dough goes and where you can save.”

Mint also uses two tactics to convince readers: a paragraph and a list. No matter which the user prefers to read, they’re walking away with information about how Mint can help them.

What to learn from it:

  • Acknowledge and sympathize with the user’s scenario and how they feel about tasks

  • Present information in different ways, such as a list vs. paragraph vs. image, so that a reader gets the message no matter what type of learner they are

Day 23: Use Case

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Subject Line: Wait, I didn’t spend $300 at the taco truck…

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Day 23, 9:50 AM CST

Objective/Content: Use Mint tools to make budgeting easier

CTA: Get Started

Strengths:

As the onboarding sequence progresses, Mint’s use cases are ramping up from “nice to have” to “need to have.” The benefits mentioned started off as ways to seek reward. Now, Mint is showing itself as a way to avoid pain.

Sure, improving your credit score and saving more are good goals. But they can’t always hold your interest or attention. But the thought of having your money stolen or your accounts tampered with? That’s serious business.

Also, I love this subject line. It’s catchy and attention-grabbing without actually misleading you about what’s inside.

What to learn from it:

  • Experiencing a loss is more powerful than gaining a reward. Place reward-based use cases at the beginning of the sequence, and more serious pain-avoidance benefits at the end

Day 31: Winback

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Subject Line: We miss you already

Sender Name: Mint

Send Time: Day 23, 9:50 AM CST

Objective/Content: Use Mint tools to make budgeting easier

CTA: Get Started

Strengths:

Ah, the emotional winback. Classic. The subject line “we miss you already” is a quintessential winback line, but I do like the spin they use inside the email. The subject line might be woe is me, but the headline (and carefree summer photo) inside paints a picture of the ideal future.

They also address why you signed up in the first place, as well as mitigating any concerns or objections you may have.

What to learn from it:

  • Take time in the winback email to remind a user why they chose you in the first place, as well as address any mental roadblocks they may be experiencing

Series Review:

I love that Mint has found a layout that works, and ran with it. An image, header, bold CTA button, and some simple copy is all you need. I think they also have a great grasp on what users are feeling, and use emotions as a motivator.

Want to know when to send SaaS emails and what to say?

I’ve got 30+ free email templates in the SaaS Email Marketing Toolkit here.