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10 Awesome Examples of SaaS Email Copywriting

What Good SaaS Email Copy Looks Like

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Writing, especially email copy, is a bit subjective. A tone and style that makes sense for one company could be totally out of place for another.

I think that’s part of the reason it can feel like a daunting beast to tackle for some (on top of the pressure that email is powerful, when done right). However, I think there are elements of email copywriting that get a universal thumbs up.

“Good” copy for your audience may differ from what other companies are producing, but I think there are still lessons to be learned from reviewing examples.

Let’s look at 10 SaaS email examples and dive into what makes them so effective.

Grammarly gives their perspective

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You know what people like? Opinions. Don’t shy away from sharing your company’s unique perspective and outlook on the world or industry. In the example above, Grammarly outlines exactly how they feel about writing and editing. To them, improved writing is a gateway to better communication in every area of life. Saying that using their editing tool can improve your relationships is a big claim, but it shows they aren’t afraid to speak their mind.

Takeaway:

Take a moment at the beginning of the customer relationship to explain to them why your company does what it does. Set the tone for the perspective of your team because it helps you authentically stand out.

Wistia thinks outside the box

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As soon as I had the idea to write this post, this email from Wistia came to mind. Instead of a run-of-the-mill intro email, Wistia created a poem to introduce the tools at hand. This pome instantly stood out against the many other emails I review each week, and I haven’t forgotten about it since

Takeaway:

Try something different. Shake up your copy and have fun.

Gusto tells a story

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Email copy allows you to paint a picture in the reader’s mind. In this example, Gusto uses a few small changes to increase the impact of their copy tenfold. Instead of simply listing out the steps to take to run payroll, they stuck time stamps next to them. This little idea immediately adds more context and drives the point home.

Takeaway:

Consider what you can add to support the point you’re trying to make. Even simple tweaks in formatting can elevate simple copy.

Mailchimp backs up their claims

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Stats from existing users almost always make copy more impactful. Mailchimp starts by catching a reader’s interest by mentioning a goal they obviously have. Then, they show them the way by mentioning pop ups. Finally, Mailchimp adds credibility to their claim through data.

Takeaway:

How can you get others to vouch for your ideas? Including user results, stats, or reviews adds credibility. Just don’t overuse this tactic.

Mint passes the baton

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Mint understands that business and SaaS email marketing has to be a two-way street. This email example passes the baton to the reader, and puts success in their hands. First, Mint compliments the reader’s choice (you understand the potential). Then, they let them know that involvement is needed.

Takeaway:

Sometimes you need to get real with readers. If pointing out use cases isn’t working, you can put a little pressure on them by reminding them they need to get involved.

Shopify lends a helping hand

Shopify is amazing at sending valuable resources to its users. What sets this email apart, though, is how Shopify sympathizes with readers. They understand and convey user goals, challenges, and questions. It isn’t a hard sell, it’s a helping hand.

Takeaway:

Be a friend and resource for users. Sympathize with their challenges and let them know you understand what they’re trying to achieve.

Customer.io asks for feedback

Want an example of how simple good SaaS email copy can be? Look no further than Customer.io. It’s a simple text email that’s short, sweet, and casual.

Takeaway:

Don’t overthink every email marketing move. Write how you would speak to a friend, and create an email that wouldn’t look out of place between colleagues.

FreshBooks points to the community

Don’t have user stats or feedback to use alongside your claims? Take a page from the FreshBooks playbook and mention the community from a high level. It’s a small detail, but I like that the email says “you’ve just joined the community of small business owners who, like you, use FreshBooks.” They’ve turned a simple free trial into an invitation into a club of like-minded folks.

Takeaway:

Use copy to build community, and community to build copy.

Airtable takes out the guess work

Airtable doesn’t assume users will know how to take advantage of tools, and neither should you. Instead of just introducing the feature, Airtable gives a few use case examples. This email also offers a few different ways to learn—they have a visual at the top, a link to a hands-on example, and a list of uses cases.

Takeaway:

Don’t assume users know what to do, and don’t assume there’s only one way to teach them. Using visuals and copy together covers more bases.

Evernote is laser focused

I like specific CTA buttons. Evernote’s CTA button in this email tells me exactly where it’s taking me, and what I’ll do once I get there. This email perfectly sets up the feature and its use cases, and has a very clear arrow pointing to the next step.

Takeaway:

Emails should set expectations about where you’re taking a user once they click. Use your copy and buttons to set the scene s that there’s a seamless transition from email to in-app.

Which email is your favorite?

Want to know when to send SaaS emails and what to say?

I’ve got 30+ free email templates in the SaaS Email Marketing Toolkit here.

Stephanie KnappComment